PETA Supports Eating Meat - Find Out Why - Animal Writes: PETA Foundation’s Blog Animal Writes: PETA Foundation’s Blog
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  • Jan

PETA Supports Eating Meat – Find Out Why

A subject that has generated some interesting discussions in the office and that we’d love to hear your views on is PETA-approved meat – in vitro meat, that is! Although in vitro meat isn’t on supermarket shelves yet, it will be in our lifetime. The technology involves painlessly taking a few cells from a live animal and putting them into a nutritious medium in which they will divide. Scientists have already concluded that a few cells can feed an entire nation – in fact, the world.

Every year, billions of animals are raised and killed in hellish conditions for their flesh. Animals raised for food are kicked and prodded when ill or injured and crammed into cages and trucks before making the journey to a blood-soaked killing floor. Chickens are hung upside down by their legs and “stunned” in a putrid, electrified bath. They are often still conscious when their throats are slit and they are plunged into scalding-hot defeathering tanks. If lab-grown meat becomes readily available, it could effectively bring an end to the cruel system by which animals are killed for food.

Shifting large-scale dependence on animal agriculture to lab-grown meat would also help improve human health because lab-grown meat would eliminate the use of hormones, steroids and antibiotics. Outbreaks of mad cow disease, avian flu, salmonella and E. coli caused by the meat industry would become a thing of the past.

If consumers knew the scope and scale of how much of what they eat is processed, making the psychological adjustment to “fake” meat wouldn’t be much of a leap at all. Animal flesh is already sliced, diced, radiated, decontaminated, frozen, preserved and injected with additives. Meat is not “unadulterated” much less pure.

There are now a staggering 7 billion humans to feed on this planet. We’re using far too much land and water to raise animals for food and to grow grain to feed and fatten them – and we’re generating massive amounts of pollution in the process.

Fortunately, no one has to wait until in vitro meat is available to help animals and improve their own health. Meatless burgers, vegan chicken nuggets and even “fish” fingers are delicious and much kinder to your body – and to animals. We have so many choices right now that there’s no reason to continue raising and slaughtering animals for food.

So, would you eat in vitro meat?

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Comments

  1. avatar Jessica says:

    Being Vegan I’ve found more than enough healthy substitutes for meat that there really is no need for me to ever go back to eating meat or any other animal product.

  2. avatar Katie Carlile says:

    It seems good for those who ‘love’ meat and won’t give it up at all costs but it’s still meat and we don’t need it to survive. Plus the cells still need to be taken from an animal and who’s to say the people who make it aren’t cruel to those animals? Then you have the debate from ethics of personhood or in this case animalhood :L i think i’d stick to veggie burgers, messing around with cells doesn’t sound healthy.

  3. avatar LilAli89 says:

    I don’t know if I would eat it, because I already get used to eat my meals without any kind of meat. I’m vegetarian since 2009! But whole idea, about meat what’s raised in lab, ain’t bad!

  4. avatar Brien Comerford says:

    The vegan products that simulate and surpass the taste of beef, meat, poultry and sausage are already more than enough to convince any person with taste and decency to eschew flesh-foods.

  5. avatar Denise says:

    I am a vegan because I am against the cruelty towards animals. But at the same time I know meat is simply unhealthy for humans so it should be discouraged at all times. (plus the environment etc.) However the idea of everyone on the planet switching to a vegetarian/vegan diet is an almost impossible task, so this ‘in vitro cruelty free’ meat would be a great option for the stubborn people out there.

    I’d welcome this meat for all the stray cats and dogs I have to feed every day.

  6. avatar John Alexander Gibson says:

    This is very interesting, I never new such a thing was possible. This would be a good step towards shutting down the meat industry. My only concern is how the cells would be taken from the animals, would animals be specifically bred just to take cells from? Would they have freedom to live their lives as normal or would they be constantly bothered having their cells taken causing stress to the animals. Really should we still be hooked on the taste of meat when a plant based diet is far more tasty, beneficial and exciting at the same time. Also take the fashion industry for an example there is faux fur which looks the same as real fur yet some fashion designers still use real fur. Will this be the same for the fake meat, will people still eat real meat even though theirs an alternative? I think there has to be further discussion on this subject. I myself was a meat eater for many years but I eventually became a vegan, if more people were to watch the glass walls documentary that would be enough to change people’s minds to relegate the killing of animals to the past. We must look to a vegan future.

  7. avatar Erin says:

    It makes me sick the cruelty that goes on in modern farming, if people really feel that they need meat, they should at least have the decency to buy from family run farms where animals are treated with respect and aren’t kept in such awful conditions. If anyone is interested in helping hens and rescuing them from battery farms, have a look at the British Hens Welfare Trust page :)

    • avatar NealB_AR says:

      Sadly buying from ‘family run farms’ doesn’t guarantee anything. In fact it makes little or no difference at all.

  8. avatar Rivvy says:

    Although I don’t personally think I’ll ever eat meat again, this is a massive step forwards for our entire planet. A lot of people raise concerns about “messing around with nature” and genetically modified food etc. but there’s so little we can eat that’s never been modified in some way. If it weren’t for steps like this there wouldn’t be grains that grow well in poor soil that help feed millions in third world countries, or the hardy vegetable crops we use in our own lives. This obviously has another issue added on top of that – is it fair to use the animal’s cells in the first place, but even as a vegan I’d say that if this can stop the mass use of animals for food, then it’s a positive step. If we were cannibalistic by nature, and they wanted to grow human meat in a lab for food purposes, I’d volunteer to give my cells to start everything off, because it could potentially end the requirement of death for food.

    • avatar Alexander says:

      Although I don’t personally think I’ll ever eat meat again, this is a massive step forwards for our entire planet. A lot of people raise concerns about “messing around with nature” and genetically modified food etc. but there’s so little we can eat that’s never been modified in some way. If it weren’t for steps like this there wouldn’t be grains that grow well in poor soil that help feed millions in third world countries, or the hardy vegetable crops we use in our own lives. This obviously has another issue added on top of that – is it fair to use the animal’s cells in the first place, but even as a vegan I’d say that if this can stop the mass use of animals for food, then it’s a positive step. If we were cannibalistic by nature, and they wanted to grow human meat in a lab for food purposes, I’d volunteer to give my cells to start everything off, because it could potentially end the requirement of death for food.

      …..thats you, thats what you sound like, tut tut………..

  9. avatar john hughea says:

    I’ve been Vegetarian for 25 years, 90% Vegan for past 6years.
    Not only am I a trim, Very Fit & healthy 56 year old, I get a double bonus from eating great food 1) healthy body ( no meat rotting away for 7 days in my bottom parts !!) and most importantly 2) my SOUL is pure, with no blood or cruelty on my conscience whilst enjoying my lovely grub. Dog Bless you , from me and all at -dogsmountain.com. xx

  10. Invitro meat sounds like a good way to feed all the starving people out there
    A few bulletpoints for you
    *No tapeworms
    *Cancer can be removed
    *Does not need as much water and grain as a real animal
    *It’s real meat,just grown in a lab
    *AR/AL can get their protein and be as healthy as us omnivores
    *No slaughterhouses/sitting in turds/general cruelty to animals
    Hope you enjoyed.

  11. avatar Roy Wild says:

    I have been a vegetarian now for twenty five years or so, not because of health reasons, but for compassion for the plight of what poor animals go through. I could never kill an animal for food, nor will I let someone who is totally devoid of feeling do it on my behalf. As to whether I could be classified as vegan I’m not sure! I don’t eat butter, milk or eggs, but my wrist watch strap is leather as are my shoes, so I welcome comments.

    One of the best reasons I ever heard for being a vegetarian was from George Bernard Shaw, when asked why he had refrained from eating meat all his life,
    replied, I won’t make my stomach a graveyard for animals.

  12. avatar Leah says:

    Lab grown meat sounds like it might be a good way to go, but it will probably be expensive. For those of you that are worried about the welfare of the animal it came from, don’t. The stem cells can be taken from an embryo as soon as it has developed the cells that will become muscle, which is long before nervous tissue develops (so no pain). They can then be perpetuated as a cell line for ever so no need to repeat the procedure on another of the same species.

    However, for true meat lovers, this may not satisfy. It will probably not taste like much, which will by fine for the Americans, who don’t believe in flavour anyway.

    • avatar Rhian says:

      I read that the first burger to be made this way would cost $200, 000. It was in an article about two scientists working on meat free “meat” that tastes as good as the real thing. One, the one described here, would involve some use of animals therefore making it questionable whether it would be vegan. But the other scientist is a vegan and is using another method. Either way will save so much suffering and death that I can’t think of an objection beyond the current price tag and that I might not personally want the meat, but I’d be surprised if I didn’t sample it. I miss plenty of meat foods, just not enough to eat them.

  13. [...] Aside from their environmental impact, the meat, dairy and egg industries cause immense suffering to more than a billion animals every year in the UK alone, most of whom spend their entire lives crammed into dark, filthy sheds. They don’t get to breathe fresh air until they are on their way to the abattoir, where many have their throats slit while they are still conscious. [...]

  14. [...] Aside from their environmental impact, the meat, dairy and egg industries cause immense suffering to more than a billion animals every year in the UK alone, most of whom spend their entire lives crammed into dark, filthy sheds. They don’t get to breathe fresh air until they are on their way to the abattoir, where many have their throats slit while they are still conscious. [...]

  15. avatar Rhian says:

    Looked up what I noted above a bit further, and it seems in-vitro meat, as mentioned in the article (link below) does involve slaughter, albeit on a much smaller scale:

    “Then you kill it. The creation of in-vitro meat does require the slaughter of animals, but the point is that, in theory, a single specimen could provide the seed material for hundreds of tonnes of meat. Only a tiny fraction of the farm animals alive today would be needed to supply the entire human race.”

    But reading the article you can see that there is a cruelty/animal free way being pioneered too:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jun/22/fake-meat-scientific-breakthroughs-research

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